Former medical examiner Bruce Levy pleads guilty to official misconduct

The Tennessean, tennessean.com
BYLINE: Brian Haas • THE TENNESSEAN • November 24, 2010

Nashville, TN

2010-11-24_INT_Former medical examiner Bruce Levy pleads guilty
Bruce Levy pleaded guilty to a misconduct charge regarding the removal of marijuana from evidence closets. JOHN PARTIPILO / THE TENNESSEAN

A small amount of marijuana found in a Mississippi hotel room has forced big changes in the way Nashville's medical examiner stores and handles property.

The marijuana was taken from corpses. And the person who took it was the man tasked with examining the bodies of people who died tragically in Tennessee and Mississippi.

Tuesday's guilty plea by Dr. Bruce Levy on a charge of official misconduct raises serious questions about the way his office secured and stored evidence, particularly illegal drugs. Prosecutors said Levy took some of the marijuana from a locker that stores evidence from autopsies at Forensic Medical, the company that hosts the medical examiner's office.

Despite assertions that security was always adequate, Davidson County's interim chief medical examiner has since installed fingerprint scanners and other security measures to limit and track access to evidence.

"Prior to this incident, there has never been an issue with the integrity of the evidence that is either collected or stored at the medical examiner's offices," Dr. Amy McMaster said Tuesday. She didn't elaborate on the office's prior security policies.

Levy, 50, didn't speak after the plea. His attorney, David Raybin, read a statement on his behalf, apologizing to the people of Tennessee and detailing eight months of addiction recovery. If Levy sticks to the terms of his three-year probation, he won't spend a moment in prison and the felony charge will be wiped from his record.

"I am committed to a useful and productive medical career so that I will be able to continue to serve and help my fellow Tennesseans," Raybin read.

The case against Levy was another embarrassment for Davidson County's Office of the Medical Examiner. In 1998, Levy replaced Dr. Charles Harlan, who had his medical license revoked for misconduct. Complaints against Harlan included incomplete examinations, botched cases and macabre personal behavior that included storing body parts in his laundry room.

Though Levy himself was criticized for allowing a television show to videotape autopsies without families' permission, he was largely credited with restoring integrity to the office, a feat that prosecutors recognized Tuesday after the plea.

"They brought a professionalism to that office that I hope people don't forget about. He did a wonderful job," said Assistant District Attorney General Dan Hamm. "Does that excuse what he did? No. He's paid the price for it."

Bust was in Mississippi

The misconduct charge stemmed from a March 16 bust in Madison County, Miss., where Levy was set to testify in a case. Narcotics agents there seized a package containing marijuana headed for his hotel room. They found more marijuana in the room, totaling about 48 grams in all.

Prosecutors on Tuesday said that some of that marijuana was found in a sealed evidence bag, taken from a Forensic Medical evidence closet. Assistant District Attorney General Dina Shabayek said the medical examiner typically stores property and evidence only in non-criminal cases such as accidents and suicides. She said it is kept in two closets, one for Davidson County, the other for other counties.

In all, she said, five bags containing marijuana were taken from the non-Davidson County evidence closet. She said they couldn't prove Levy took all five, but "nobody else is suspected."

The extent of the missing marijuana was discovered in a Tennessee Bureau of Investigation audit, which officials said is not public record. It is unclear whether the audit turned up other missing evidence.

Levy entered a pretrial diversion program in Mississippi, avoiding a conviction and allowing him to expunge his criminal record there, too, if he follows through with his probation.

Standards can vary

Industry standards for evidence handling are hit-or-miss, said Joe Latta, executive director of the International Association for Property and Evidence. He said many police departments don't have formal evidence policies, much less a medical examiner's office.

"Rarely do we have any standards," said Latta, whose group trains law enforcement on best practices for handling evidence. "I'm guessing his predecessor, his predecessor's predecessor, didn't have any guidelines."

Storing illegal drugs at a medical examiner's office for any length of time is particularly difficult, he said.

"It's just opening it up for problems," he said. "They need to probably adopt some good, sound property room standards and limit access to it."

McMaster said that despite her satisfaction with prior policies, she has tightened them.

Mayor is satisfied

Mayor Karl Dean said through a spokeswoman that he was satisfied with the security changes.

Prosecutors said no current or past criminal cases will be affected by Levy's guilty plea and none of the drugs taken from evidence was part of a prosecution.

Levy will even testify in coming days in Mississippi in at least two criminal cases.

Raybin said Levy's guilty plea won't come up because Levy wasn't actually convicted of any of the charges.

Raybin was less open in discussing Levy's future.

A state board last week allowed Levy to keep his medical license, albeit on a probationary basis for the next five years.

"We decline to discuss Dr. Levy's future plans except to say that now that these things are behind him and he's on diversion, he's in a good position to move forward," Raybin said.

Contact Brian Haas at 615-726-8986 or .

Bruce Levy Through the Years
Levy's medical examiner career

Former state and Davidson County Medical Examiner Bruce Levy has been charged with official misconduct, according to court records. Levy, 60, will be in court Tuesday morning in connection with the new charge. File / The Tennessean
<em>Former state and Davidson County Medical Examiner Bruce Levy has been charged with official misconduct, according to court records. Levy, 60, will be in court Tuesday morning in connection with the new charge.</em> File / The Tennessean


Dr. Bruce Levy, age 49, in a mugshot when he was charged with possession of marijuana in Mississippi after authorities there intercepted a package of marijuana bound for his hotel room. He entered a pretrial diversion program, avoiding conviction and allowing him to eventually expunge the charge. File / The Tennessean
<em>Dr. Bruce Levy, age 49, in a mugshot when he was charged with possession of marijuana in Mississippi after authorities there intercepted a package of marijuana bound for his hotel room. He entered a pretrial diversion program, avoiding conviction and allowing him to eventually expunge the charge.</em> File / The Tennessean


State Medical Examiner Bruce Levy gets ready to examine a body at the morgue. One autopsy costs taxpayers approximately $2,500. File / The Tennessean
<em>State Medical Examiner Bruce Levy gets ready to examine a body at the morgue. One autopsy costs taxpayers approximately $2,500. </em> File / The Tennessean


From 1998, Dr. Bruce Levy, Tennessee medical examiner, answers questions after performing an autopsy on the body of James Earl Ray in Nashville, Tenn. on Friday, April 24, 1998. Ray died Thursday at the age of 70 due to complications of a chronic hepatitis infection. File / The Tennessean
<em>From 1998, Dr. Bruce Levy, Tennessee medical examiner, answers questions after performing an autopsy on the body of James Earl Ray in Nashville, Tenn. on Friday, April 24, 1998. Ray died Thursday at the age of 70 due to complications of a chronic hepatitis infection. </em> File / The Tennessean


Dr. Bruce Levy finishes up a morning of autopsies as his staff sews up a body in background at the medical examiner\'s office. File / The Tennessean
<em>Dr. Bruce Levy finishes up a morning of autopsies as his staff sews up a body in background at the medical examiner039;s office. </em> File / The Tennessean


Dr. Bruce Levy answers questions from the news media after announcing the results of the Tammy Wynette autopsy. File / The Tennessean
<em>Dr. Bruce Levy answers questions from the news media after announcing the results of the Tammy Wynette autopsy.</em> File / The Tennessean


From 2001, Bruce Levy, metro and state medical examiner, shows off the main autopsy station in the new Metro-State morgue. File / The Tennessean
<em>From 2001, Bruce Levy, metro and state medical examiner, shows off the main autopsy station in the new Metro-State morgue. </em> File / The Tennessean


Davidson County Medical Examiner Bruce Levy explains the entry and exit wounds of one of the Captain D\'s victims during the second day trial of Paul Reid. File / The Tennessean
<em>Davidson County Medical Examiner Bruce Levy explains the entry and exit wounds of one of the Captain D039;s victims during the second day trial of Paul Reid.</em> File / The Tennessean


Chief Medical Examiner Bruce Levy gathers forensic evidence during an autopsy. File / The Tennessean
<em>Chief Medical Examiner Bruce Levy gathers forensic evidence during an autopsy.</em> File / The Tennessean


Chief Medical Examiner Bruce Levy File / The Tennessean
<em>Chief Medical Examiner Bruce Levy</em> File / The Tennessean


Dr. Bruce Levy gets ready to perform an autopsy as his staff works on another body in background at the medical examiner\'s office. File / The Tennessean
<em>Dr. Bruce Levy gets ready to perform an autopsy as his staff works on another body in background at the medical examiner039;s office.</em> File / The Tennessean


Dr. Bruce Levy, metro medical examiner, is featured in a TV documentary on autopsies and forensic science. File / The Tennessean
<em>Dr. Bruce Levy, metro medical examiner, is featured in a TV documentary on autopsies and forensic science.</em> File / The Tennessean


With Asst District Attorney Dan Runde on his knees, Dr Bruce Levy shows the angle of a bullett that was fired into the shoulder of Freda Elliott. File / The Tennessean
<em>With Asst District Attorney Dan Runde on his knees, Dr Bruce Levy shows the angle of a bullett that was fired into the shoulder of Freda Elliott.</em> File / The Tennessean


Davidson County Medical Examiner Bruce Levy pauses during a press conference to answer questions from the media concerning his decision not to conduct an autopsy on Tammy Wynette. File / The Tennessean
<em>Davidson County Medical Examiner Bruce Levy pauses during a press conference to answer questions from the media concerning his decision not to conduct an autopsy on Tammy Wynette. </em> File / The Tennessean


Metro. Davidson County Medical Examiner Bruce Levy addresses the media in a press conference convened to announce his decision not to request an autopsy for Tammy Wynette. File / The Tennessean
<em>Metro. Davidson County Medical Examiner Bruce Levy addresses the media in a press conference convened to announce his decision not to request an autopsy for Tammy Wynette. </em> File / The Tennessean


Bruce Levy, Chief Medical Examiner for Metro looks over a speciman slide on a microscope in his office. File / The Tennessean
<em>Bruce Levy, Chief Medical Examiner for Metro looks over a speciman slide on a microscope in his office.</em> File / The Tennessean


State Chief Medical Examiner as well as Davidson County Medical Examiner Dr. Bruce Levy testifies during the trial of Jerome Barrett who is charged in the killing of Sarah Des Prez in 1975 in the courtroom of Judge Steve Dozier at the A.A. Birch Building in Nashville Wednesday, January 28, 2009. Sanford Myers / File / The Tennessean
<em>State Chief Medical Examiner as well as Davidson County Medical Examiner Dr. Bruce Levy testifies during the trial of Jerome Barrett who is charged in the killing of Sarah Des Prez in 1975 in the courtroom of Judge Steve Dozier at the A.A. Birch Building in Nashville Wednesday, January 28, 2009.</em> Sanford Myers / File / The Tennessean


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
International Association for Property and Evidence
"Law Enforcement Serving the Needs of Law Enforcement"
www.IAPE.org
Rate this blog entry:
LOST IN THE SHUFFLE;
Evidence lost in at least 4 Dane County cold cases

Related Posts

 

Blotter - Latest News

News By Region

Keywords

trooper arrested sloppy evidence control technician arrested untested rape kits Suicide sheriffs department theft of drugs STEALING DRUG MONEY storage bunker stealing funs STOLEN CASH tape untested rape kit Wrongful conviction unaccouted guns temporary locker trooper sentenced trooper accused Wattier Untested rape kit stored evidence stealing cash untestes rape kits threw away evidence untestted sexual assault kits WRONGFUL CONVICTION untested sexual assault evidence snakes State/Province stolen ammunition Standards stolen gun tapes edited taking heroin trial untested sexual kit urn state government taking marijuana thieving evidence room cop stolen marijuana stealing bills sexual assault task force valuable stones stolen heroin tampered evidence tampered drugs Sexual assault Survivors Bill of Rights testing guns St stolen drug from evidence stealing narcotics Trial at Riak stealing drug Ventura County sheriff stolen cash tampering with public record sheriff stealing heroin South Dakota Highway Patrolman Sheriff Arrested stealing pistols state audit wrongful conviction undersheriff stealing gungs show strange evidence stolen gons steal evidnece side door Thursday.Charles Holifield State Agency Evidence Jobs theft of money Washington State Patrol crime lab withholding evidence stolen money stealing evidence Untest rape kits untest rape kit unit stored as evidence stolen cannabis Vancouver BC Transient property with holding evidence state chips stolen jewelry steal drugs West Coast sheriffs employee gets jail stealing cocaine Williams took heroin unscientific protocols stealing money state Division storage practices skunky aroma wafted years of neglect Via URL Browse Media Upload United Kingdom shelves stole evidence sting operation Tulare Police tampering with evidence tampering with police records UNTESTED RAPE KITS towing scandal stolen meth stealing drugs unaccounted drugs sheriff arrested Untested rape kits theft of evidence Sheriff pleads guilty stolen cocaine woochy poochy stolen methamphetamine Signed Out Evidence Thursday stolne guns State trooper accused stolen OxyContin tampered envelopes unwanted medications stealing guns Stolen pills statute of limitations Theft stolen drugs stolen evidence week stolen bike Wrongful Conviction vault of contraband Untested Sexual Kits stealing drug evidence wrongly convicted Wichita Police Department unsolved murder Year state prison untested evidence kits theft conviction Texas Forensic Science Commission Storage steal money stolen guns work

Search IAPE

  • All
  • Best Practices
  • DEA
  • Drugs
  • NIOSH
  • Default
  • Title